The Divided Brain

Iain McGilchrist has written a fascinating book, The Master and His Emissary, about the brain. I am in the process of going back to it as I am doing some deeper research and getting more into people like Heidegger and Merleu Ponty. Many questions left unanswered, but a much needed update on the issue of exactly how our brains are divided, and what this means for their conceptualisation of the world. It is tricky stuff to get into if you read the book with a “left brain” perspective, and I think I did that the first time around.

McGilchrist makes much reference to Heidegger in his book, and it is so interesting to read The Master and his Emmissary with a working knowledge of Heidegger’s dynamical way of thinking.  McGilchrist writes:

“The world calling forth something in me that in turn calls forth something in the world.  So there is something in the world which calls forth something in me, and that calls forth that in the world which is calling in forth something in me.”

This replaces epistemology, there is no subject object.  There is a paradox of subjective objectivity, and objective subjectivity.  This is dynamic and can not be separated.

4 responses to “The Divided Brain

  1. Hi Simon,

    Fantastic blog – a great resource for people interested in Bortoft’s work. McGilchrist’s book is an interesting review of an old idea, but arising from a very ‘left-brain’ view of the world. The psychiatric belief about schizophrenia being the product of excess dopamine is an example of the kind of linear thinking that permeates the book.
    Have you come across http://www.caetextia.com? This idea presents the role of the brain’s hemispheres in a richer context.

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