My Retrospective of the Salvador Dalí Retrospective

This final article closes my retrospective of the Salvador Dalí retrospective at the Instituto Tomie Ohtake in São Paulo which opened on 19th October 2014 and which closes on January 11th 2015.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

The full series is here:

In Praise of the Curators of Salvador Dalí at Instituto Tomie Ohtake, São Paulo

Salvador Dalí Illustrates Faust

Salvador Dalí Illustrates Alice in Wonderland

The Dynamics of Seeing within Salvador Dalí’s Illustrations of Dom Quixote

Salvador Dalí’s Flowers

Salvador Dalí’s Fruits

It had been a huge education for me, visiting this exhibition three times in total, each time with a different frame of mind. It is interesting looking back at my pictures, since there were many of Dalí’s paintings and illustrations which I did not take photos of, some of which I now regret not trying to capture despite the challenging lighting conditions, and others which were disturbing to me, such as the many depicting self-mutilation to the point of butchery.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

I still can not praise the team at Instituto Tomie Ohtake enough, and also those who contributed to the incredibly diverse and intelligently laid out retrospective, which as you moved through, showed us recurring themes and also the development of Dali’s ideas and influences, from the early contact with Picasso and the work of Freud, to his own surrealist genius and inspiration from the Renaissance.

I thought I would use this article to show you some of the exhibits not yet covered in my other articles, such as the blockbuster paintings which drew dense crowds.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Here are some of of the other very amazing illustrations, and details to be found.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Accompanying the artwork were many exhibits to help us explore the progress of the presentation of Dalí in both the art world and mass media.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

I don’t know if anyone has looked through all of this series, but it soon becomes clear just how near obsessed Dali was with certain recurring themes, such as the Y shaped crutches which symbolise life and death. I was also blown away by the deceptive manner in which Dalí was able to draw horses, just with swirling lines.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

What I now need to do is to study the life of Dalí, searching out his biography and interviews to give me a glimpse into his creative mind. He certainly seems to have a deep perception not just artistically, by culturally and politically, sending us extremely profound messages about our human condition if we have the eyes to see.

Photo: Simon Robinson

Photo: Simon Robinson

Finally, I should say that Instituto Tomie Ohtake have produced a superb book featuring every single piece of artwork from the exhibition, and given the quality and size of it, is a very reasonable R$100 (around £25). It is available from Queen Books in Brazil (queenbooks.com.br/produto/1316/salvador-dali.html).

Related Links

In Praise of the Curators of Salvador Dalí at Instituto Tomie Ohtake, São Paulo

Salvador Dalí Illustrates Faust

Salvador Dalí Illustrates Alice in Wonderland

The Dynamics of Seeing within Salvador Dalí’s Illustrations of Dom Quixote

Salvador Dalí’s Flowers

Salvador Dalí’s Fruits

3 responses to “My Retrospective of the Salvador Dalí Retrospective

  1. Pingback: In Praise of the Curators of Salvador Dalí at Instituto Tomie Ohtake, São Paulo | Transition Consciousness·

  2. Pingback: Joan Miró Will Eat Himself – The Destruction of Art as a Work of Art | Transition Consciousness·

  3. Pingback: Artistic Consciousness and Rudolf Steiner’s Theory of Colour | Transition Consciousness·

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