The Foundations of Holonomics 11: Truth, Method and Experience

In this series we have been exploring the various elements of the Holonomics Approach as they are described in the Holonomic Circle. Up until this point we have been deepening our understanding of the various different elements that constitute the circle. But in this lecture we will be exploring the framework in a systemic manner, understanding the dynamic interplay between the differing levels of the circle, and in the inter-relationships between ‘what we say’ and ‘what we mean’ in the Trinity of Authenticity, ‘meaning’ and ‘methods’ in Tools and Techniques, and ‘truth’ and ‘identity and difference’ in the Transcendentals.

Credit: Simon Robinson and Maria Moraes Robinson

When introducing ourselves and our Holonomics approach to people, they will often mention concepts they are familiar with and say that they have heard of management systems such as Holacracy or other conceptions of wholeness such as Arthur Koestler’s conception of holons. For many people, all of these are equivalent to Holonomics as these systems reference parts and wholes in some manner.

It is important to emphasise that Holonomics works with the dynamic conception of wholeness, and this particular lecture is vital for understanding this particular conception in which we are able to develop the ability to see concepts directly. In order to understand how this could be, Henri takes us through a number of different examples including Goethe’s Theory of Colour, the surprising critique of naive empiricism of Francis Bacon, and the way in which we can discover the universal and particular in poetry.

In this lecture Henri explores the notion of truth in science and asking the question of whether or not science can ever provide us with absolute truths. Or is it the case that in fact other methods which can complement more traditional scientific methodologies can also provide us with a way in which we can systematically explore truth and experience?

The Holonomics Approach works by developing an expanded form of conscious awareness in people, thereby opening up new possibilities of exploring phenomena in the world, be they physical, experiential or cultural. This expanded form of consciousness changes the awareness we have about ourselves and our being in the world, thereby allowing us to develop new initiatives, organisations and experiences which can take us collectively to higher ground, one in which our ecosystems can flourish and we as a society can thrive.

The main recommended reading for this lecture is Customer Experiences with Soul: A New Era in Design, Robinson and Moraes Robinson (2017) in which truth, method and experience are explored in detail.

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These lectures were recorded at The Old Postern, Schumacher College, Totnes, Devon, in September 2011. The lectures are ©Jacqueline Bortoft and have been made available with her kind permission.

All extracts from Henri Bortoft (2012), Taking Appearance Seriously, have been reproduced with permission from Floris Books, Edinburgh.

Recommended reading to accompany this series:

Henri Bortoft, The Wholeness of Nature: Goethe’s Way of Science, Floris Books, Edinbugh
Henri Bortoft (1996), The Wholeness of Nature: Goethe’s Way of Science, Floris Books, Edinbugh
Henri Bortoft (2012), Taking Appearance Seriously: The Dynamic Way of Seeing in Goethe and European Thought, Floris Books, Edinbugh
Simon Robinson and Maria Moraes Robinson (2014), Holonomics: Business Where People and Planet Matter, Floris Books, Edinbugh
Simon Robinson and Maria Moraes Robinson (2017), Customer Experiences with Soul: A New Era in Design, Holonomics Publishing, London

One response to “The Foundations of Holonomics 11: Truth, Method and Experience

  1. Pingback: The Foundations of Holonomics: Exploring Wholeness in Nature and Organisations | Transition Consciousness·

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